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Cyphotilapia Photo Discussion Share photos of your Cyphotilapia frontosa, gibberosa and their aquariums.


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  #1  
Old 05-21-2016, 03:10 PM
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Default What is this purple in the substrate sand?

I have only 3 Frontosas in this tank of 6 ft size. Each are about 8 to 10 inches in size. And feeding only once or twice a week
This formation came in the fresh sand which is only about 15 days old in the tank. And there is no much ammonia or nitrite in the water too.

And this is a sand which is very fine, so much so, that whem the fish darts once in a while the substrate fine sand waves up to almost 3/4th height of the 2ft high tank.

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Old 05-21-2016, 03:47 PM
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Looks like Coralline algea...it's harmless.
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Old 05-21-2016, 03:48 PM
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Looks like Coralline algea...it's harmless.
Oh thanks a lot. How do i prevent it?
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Old 05-21-2016, 04:04 PM
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Not 100% sure but I would probably reduce amount or duration of lighting and stir the sand around a little once in awhile.
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Old 05-21-2016, 05:16 PM
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I think most algae can be controlled be reducing its food sources: nitrates, phosphates, and silicates. Many ways to attack that depending on what the source of the nutrients is.

Phosphates and silicates can be removed with products like SeaChem PhosGuard, PhosBond & PhosNet.

You can have critters that eat the algae like nerrite snails

You can have plants that outcompete the algae for those nutrients.

The EcoSystem sump/refugium/veggie filter that we have been talking about in this thread will do the job: http://www.cyphos.com/forums/showthread.php?t=32870
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Old 05-27-2016, 09:42 PM
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That is not coraline algae. Calcifying algae like coraline are found in marine environments, though some freshwater strains exist they are very rare and not likely to pop up in any freshwater tanks anytime soon that I k ow of. That is just what is commonly referred to as a dead spot. It's an area of your substrate that, because you use sand, has become compacted enough that no oxygen is getting to it. As a result the aerobic bacteria has died off anaerobic bacteria have taken over. It's pretty common with sand tanks especially if you have deeper areas where water flow is tough to get to.

I might try and stir it gently during your next water change. Position the siphon over top the area and use a ruler or whatever you have handy to slowly agitate the area. You don't want to stir it to quickly as the stuff that builds up in those areas can be harmful to your fish if it is allowed to build up to much... I have seen much worse examples than what you have going on in your tank. I would not worry much about ; )
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Old 05-27-2016, 09:46 PM
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Originally Posted by dparks87 View Post
That is not coraline algae. Calcifying algae like coraline are found in marine environments, though some freshwater strains exist they are very rare and not likely to pop up in any freshwater tanks anytime soon that I k ow of. That is just what is commonly referred to as a dead spot. It's an area of your substrate that, because you use sand, has become compacted enough that no oxygen is getting to it. As a result the aerobic bacteria has died off anaerobic bacteria have taken over. It's pretty common with sand tanks especially if you have deeper areas where water flow is tough to get to.

I might try and stir it gently during your next water change. Position the siphon over top the area and use a ruler or whatever you have handy to slowly agitate the area. You don't want to stir it to quickly as the stuff that builds up in those areas can be harmful to your fish if it is allowed to build up to much... I have seen much worse examples than what you have going on in your tank. I would not worry much about ; )
Thanks a ton.
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Old 05-27-2016, 10:27 PM
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That is not coraline algae. Calcifying algae like coraline are found in marine environments, though some freshwater strains exist they are very rare and not likely to pop up in any freshwater tanks anytime soon that I k ow of
I get purple algae in my f/w tanks if I don't clean the rocks for awhile. I was told it was coraline algae but maybe... I'm am/he was... wrong? I don't know to be honest?
The picture sucks and doesn't show the purple very well but this rock is actually very dark purple. Any guess at what else it might be? I'm not trying to argue or anything...just seeking knowledge.

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Old 05-28-2016, 10:20 AM
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No problem at all. What you have growing on the rock is more likely a slime algae of some kind.

Coralline algae is calcirus and very hard. Coralline is sought after in marine aquariums.

Is that rock in the same tank as the shot of the substrate you posted?
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Old 05-28-2016, 01:14 PM
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What you have growing on the rock is more likely a slime algae of some kind.
Hmm, that's interesting. Looks like I'm going to have to do a little research.
Do you know what causes it? I do a 50% water change on all of my tanks once a week, lights are on for 3-4 hrs at night with no direct sunlight during the day, very hard water with a high ph?

I wasn't the original poster.
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